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Power firm staff help pick poppies at the Tower

As the iconic poppy display at the Tower of London gradually gets taken down, UK Power Networks volunteers have been taking part in a little bit of history.

From Press releases - 1 December 2014 12:00 AM

Poppy picking volunteers.jpg

As the iconic poppy display at the Tower of London gradually gets taken down, UK Power Networks volunteers have been taking part in a little bit of history.

Nine members of staff from the Competition in Connections department, spent an afternoon in London this week, “picking” the poppies from the artwork entitled Blood-Swept Lands and Seas.
The installation commemorated the 100th anniversary of the start of the First World War with each of the 888,246 hand-made poppies representing a British and Commonwealth soldier who died during the 1914-1918 conflict.

The team from the electricity distribution company’s offices in Potters Bar, Crawley, and Maidstone, are among 8,000 people who have volunteered to pick and pack up the poppies after Armistice Day on November 11.

UK Power Networks owns and maintains the vast amount of overhead power lines, underground cables and substations which deliver electricity to eight million properties in East Anglia, London and the South East.

The company gives its 5,600 staff two paid days each year to carry out volunteer work of their choosing.

Design manager Simon Barons, who is based in St Neots, Cambridgeshire, said: “We worked for about three hours and managed to remove about six metres of poppies.
“This was a really great thing to do as a team. We are based in different offices and this has brought us all together. We all have a great rapport and the teamwork has been fantastic.
“This is an event that has been seen worldwide and it is really nice to be part of that.”

The team took part in the day on Wednesday and joined about 30 other people working in the moat to pick the poppies which are now being sent to thousands of people who have bought the flowers in memory of those who fought and died for their country.

Simon added: When you start to think about the reasons behind it and what each poppy represents it can get quite moving.
“We’re taking part in a bit of history.”