ServicesPower CutsHelp
SERVER12

News

Follow us

Twitter Icon Facebook Iconfbmessanger

Instagram Icon linkedIn Icon YouTube Icon

Tech reliance has adverse effect on memory skills

A reliance on technology is taking its toll on people’s memories, with almost a third (30%) of Brits admitting theirs isn’t as good as it was five years ago – according to new research from the Energy Networks Association (ENA).

From Press releases - 27 January 2017 12:00 AM

A reliance on technology is taking its toll on people’s memories, with almost a third (30%) of Brits admitting theirs isn’t as good as it was five years ago – according to new research from the Energy Networks Association (ENA).

The research found that 40% of Brits turn to their mobile phones to retain important numbers.

Forgetfulness seems to affect every aspect of our lives. For example, nearly two thirds (65%) of people admit they can’t remember their computer passwords and over 40% struggle with their mobile banking pin numbers.

Added to that, the majority of us struggle to remember important dates and numbers including birthdays and anniversaries. According to the research 40% of Brits can’t remember their partner’s birthday while 70% of us can’t remember our mum’s telephone number. Surprisingly, this particular research also found that over one in ten (13%) appeared not to know they should call 999 in an emergency.

UK Power Networks keeps the lights on for London, the East and South East, and head of customer services Sam Fuller said: “To help reduce the sheer amount of things people need to remember, the Energy Networks Association and electricity network operators like us have worked in partnership to launch and fund 105. It’s a memorable, free-to-call number to help people get information and advice in a power cut. It’s easy to remember as a rhyme; if your power’s not live, call 105.

“This service, which puts people straight through to their local electricity network operator, is working really well and means you don’t need to remember your local power company’s number or potentially contact the wrong organisation.”

To help people boost their memory, eight-time world memory champion, Dominic O’Brien said: “Everyone has a different way of remembering information, however, there are certain things you can do to help you retain numbers.

“One method that is particularly useful is to think of the shape of a number and create a story involving these shapes. For example, to remember 105, think of the number Ten as a powerful number, Ten out of Ten or Top Ten. Cut the ten in half (Power Cut) to leave 5. Half of Ten is Five: 10 5.”

David Smith, Chief Executive of the Energy Networks Association, added: “Many people mistakenly believe that they should call the company which they buy their electricity from during a power cut. That’s not the case – it’s the network operators who will get the power back on, and 105 is a simple and memorable way to get through to the people who can help.”

People can call 105 from all landlines and most mobile phones, no matter who they choose to buy their electricity from. For those who prefer to go online for support, they can visit www.powercut105.com.

The easy-to-use website provides direct links and details of how to contact network operators online and via social media to get information and updates about a power cut.  It also provides details about 105 and the electricity network operators funding this important national three-digit service which is the first of its type in the UK’s energy industry.